Check if you have these old Apple products that could be worth thousands

Check if you have these old Apple products that could be worth thousands

Apple products rarely grow in value over time, but a select few ancient relics are going for thousands on eBay.

Apple has grown into a $ 2.2 trillion dollar tech behemoth – it is the second most valued company in the world and meaningfully one spot ahead of Microsoft.

Under Steve Jobs’ leadership and even after his death, Apple has reached billions of people, produced iconic advertisements and reinvented retail stores – all while standing alone the forefront of personal-use technology.

As Apple grew, consumers’ appetite for buying new gadgets grew along the side of it.

Families all around the world accumulate years worth of Apple tech that starts to become outdated the moment it hits the shelves.

But some rare editions and well-preserved products are going for a small fortune on eBay – find out if you’ve been sitting on an Apple-plated gold mine.

First Generation iPod

When the iPod was first released, it was an instant hit – it became a window into someone’s personality.

In Walter Isaacson’s biography of Jobs, he explains that the device’s release had everyone asking each other “what’s on your iPod?” – even President George Bush was asked by a journalist about his tunes at the peak of iPod-mania.

After the iPod drop, it became a generational hit and could now be worth thousands.
After the iPod drop, it became a generational hit and could now be worth thousands.
REUTERS / Susan Ragan

A factory-sealed first generation iPod is listed on eBay for a stunning $ 23,000 – while an untouched first-gen iPod may truly be a rare find, a working one can fetch you $ 1,500 on Etsy.

Macintosh 128K

The original Macintosh computer was a feat of design, engineering and marketing excellence rallying around one product.

The initial price was set at $ 2,495 and Apple sold 70,000 units in the first 100 days.

An Apple Macintosh 128K computer can rack you over a thousand if its in solid condition.
An Apple Macintosh 128K computer can get you over $ 1,000 if it’s in solid condition.
Getty Images

A lightly damaged Macintosh can be had on eBay for $ 499.99 – but an expert told CNBC News that other units go for between $ 1,500 and $ 2,000.

iBook G3

The iBook looks clunky by today’s standards but its modified clamshell design and colored options were cutting edge at the time.

It was the first laptop to truly harness wi-fi and mobile computing.

The iBook was a hit when it first came out and was revolutionary.
The iBook was a hit when it first came out and was revolutionary.
NurPhoto via Getty Images

The iBook goes for a range of prices on eBay, mostly huddling around $ 200 – but one seller with a collection of iBooks is calling for $ 1,300 for one of their units.

First Generation iPad

The iPad was released in 2010 with a marketing blitz pushing the product.

An episode of Modern Family, that year’s top-ranked sitcom, was completely centered around the iPad – the episode was called “Game Changer.”

The iPad line is still operating and updating today, which hurts the appreciation value of past designs – a first-generation iPad in good working condition can fetch you about $ 55 on eBay.

First Generation iPod Shuffle

Engineers working on the iPod Shuffle were working on making the screen smaller and smaller – until Jobs recommended doing away with the screen entirely.

Jobs saw that people were curating their own music libraries – whatever came on, they had chosen to put on the device and would listen to.

Selling a first generation Shuffle won’t make you rich – one eBay listing has it priced at just $ 13.

Products in mint condition will always out-price used devices – its a good reason to buy a random Apple product, never open it, and hope it skyrockets in value as a vintage product years from now.

If you have any outdated Apple tech and intentions to sell, be sure to check the market – you don’t want to undersell a nugget of Apple history.

This story originally appeared on The Sun and has been reproduced here with permission.

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